1. Introduction

What’s proper low- and high-end with no guts in the mids? VMEQ-5 is mid range’s best friend! Two peak bands and a dip band are all you need to give your vocals, synth, guitar leads or snare drum the analog punch they’ve always needed. This little beast can also clean up a murky midrange like a boss!

2. Features

  • Two peak bands and one dip band
  • Optimized for mid-range frequencies
  • Punchy analog sound

3. Layout

1. Power On/Off Switch

Turns the EQ On or Off. Doubles as the BP button in the AFX Rack.

2. Low-Mid Peak Band Frequency Select

Chooses the low peak band frequency. The following choices are available:

200Hz
300Hz
500Hz
700Hz
1000Hz

3. Low Peak Band Gain Knob

Adjusts low peak band gain.

4. Mid-Range Dip Frequency Knob

Adjusts the mid-range dip frequency. The following choices are available:

200Hz
300Hz
500Hz
700Hz
1kHz
1.5kHz
2kHz
3kHz
4kHz
5kHz
7kHz

5. Mid-Range Dip Gain Knob

Adjusts mid-range dip gain.

6. High Mid-Band Frequency Select Knob

Chooses a frequency for the high-mid band. The following choices are available:

1.5kHz
2kHz
3kHz
4kHz
5kHz

7. High Mid-Band Dip Gain Knob

Adjusts high mid-band dip gain.

8. Power On/Off Indicator

Lights up when the EQ is turned On.

9 Output Gain Meter

Visualizes output gain.

4. Contacts

Having difficulties with the VMEQ-5 or anything else Antelope? Get in touch with us by the following means:

European Direct Support Line
+44 2039578550
10:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m. (EET), Monday – Friday
USA Direct Support Line
+1 734 418 8661
7:00 a.m. – 6:30 p.m. (EST), Monday – Friday
Online (live chat and e-mail)
Antelope Audio Support Page

5. Glossary

5.1 Shelving EQ
A shelf type EQ is the boost or cut of all frequencies above or below the cutoff frequency. It is most commonly found on the top and bottom bands of a parametric EQ.

5.2 Bell Curve
All equalizers with peaking filters use a bell curve which makes the EQ smoothly process a range of frequencies. With the bell curve, the center frequency occurs at the top of the bell curve and is the one most affected by equalization.

5.3 Low-cut Filter
Also known as high-pass filter. There are two types of pass filters in equalization. A high-pass filter (HPF) attenuates content below a cutoff frequency, allowing higher frequencies to pass through the filter. Thus, it is commonly used for cutting low frequencies. A low-pass filter (LPF) works the opposite – it attenuates content above a cutoff frequency, letting lower frequencies pass through the filter.